Robinhood

Robinhood is a free-trading app and website. It lets investors trade stocks, options, exchange-traded funds, and cryptocurrency.

What

Robinhood

Looks For

Robinhood values high quality of work and a strong work ethic in their employees. They are looking for growth-minded and collaborative individuals who believe in Robinhood’s mission.




History of

Robinhood

Robinhood’s mission is to democratize finance for all. It was founded by two Stanford graduates who had previously built two finance companies selling trading software to hedge funds when they realized Wall Street firms pay almost nothing to trade stocks, while the average American is charged $10 a trade. Robinhood was ranked #26 on Glassdoor’s Best Places to Work in 2018 and a LinkedIn Top Startup in 2019.

Robinhood

Internship Programs

Robinhood Internships

Robinhood has internship programs year-round for a variety of roles. During the program, interns work in a team where they work on various projects to help Robinhood fulfill its mission. Interns typically have a dedicated mentor who will help you navigate through your internship and Robinhood as a whole. Interns also usually work cross-functionally with other departments and teams.



What it's like to Work at

Robinhood

Quick Facts

Entry-level careers:
Engineering
Operations
Customer Support / Success
Data / Analytics
UI & UX Design
Human Resources / People / Talent
Product
industries
Financial Services
Tech
office locations
Greater San Francisco

Internship Info

Number of interns (2022)
Preferred education level
Students in their Junior year pursuing a Bachelor’s degree
Perks
  • Competitive salary
  • Catered meals and a fully stocked kitchen
  • Health & Wellness benefits
  • Commuter benefits
  • Vacation time
  • Parental leave benefits

Robinhood

Interview Process

Typically 3 to 4 phases. The process can take 2-4 weeks.

1. CodeSignal online assessment

If you are applying to a technical role, you must complete a CodeSignal online assessment consisting of your typical algorithmic problems. Most aren’t too difficult, but you will be partially graded on speed.

2. Initial Phone Screening

After you submit your application, you will go through an initial phone screening with a recruiter to briefly go over your background and see if you should be moved to the next step.

3. Phone Interview

The next step is a more in-depth phone interview. This will typically be with an employee/manager in your department of choice.

4. Video Interview or Onsite Interview

The on-site interview for engineering roles consists of one hour-long round of fairly difficult whiteboarded algorithmic problems, and a relatively easier hour-long programming session.